Arts

Margaretville teens' paper peacock dress wins state arts competition

Above: Katlynn Shamro models Margaretville's winning dress design at the competition in Saratoga Springs on April 10, 2014. Photo by Michele Dietz.

A team of high school fashion designers from Margaretville Central School took top honors at the New York State Olympics of the Visual Arts last week with an elaborate Art Nouveau dress made entirely out of paper.  The dress, pictured above and below, featured a hand-painted design featuring peacocks and a Tiffany lamp motif. 

The Margaretville high school team beat 18 other teams from across New York State to win the fashion competition -- the most competitive category, according to Michele Dietz, the art teacher who coached them. Their challenge was to create a "big, bold, colorful pattern" that was inspired by a period in art history, and Margaretville's high school team chose Art Nouveau.  Read more

High art: Balloon sculptures made for the Guggenheim soar in Catskill

Above: Jason Hackenwerth's Aviary in its original form, as a one-night installation made for a gala at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in Manhattan. Photo by Kristopher McKay.

Latex balloons are generally considered to be more the stuff of children’s birthday parties than of high art, but one sculptor is out to put a pin in that idea. Jason Hackenwerth’s buoyant works, which are touching down in Catskill this weekend, look past the common balloon’s reputation to its transcendent power as an artistic medium.

Sinuous and colorful, Hackenwerth's sculptures can call to mind anything from exotic sea flora to alien life forms. Now, as part of Catskill’s Masters on Main Street program, three of his creations are touching down in locations throughout the town in a free exhibition called Aviary: Reimagined.

“The commonality of that material is so accessible and so easy to understand,” says Hackenwerth of his chosen medium. “Instead of people being frightened of the work, as a lot of people are for contemporary art, they seem to be joyous and happy.”  Read more

Your awesome photos

You Catskills folks are a talented bunch.

Sixty-five of our readers submitted photos to our 2014 Catskills Outdoor Guide Photo Contest before the deadline last night at April 3, 2014, and they're breathtaking. Check them out in the slideshow above or in our Facebook photo album here

Entrants, if you notice that your photo is missing, let me know: julia.reischel@watershedpost.com

The winner will be announced by Tuesday, May 27, 2014, when we launch this year's 2014 edition of the Catskills Outdoor Guide.

Thanks to our sponsor, the Peekamoose Restaurant & Tap Room, for providing our grand prize of dinner for two to the winner of the contest.

This weekend: The Woodstock Writers Festival

Above: Panelists at last year's Woodstock Writers Festival. Photo by Dion Ogust.

Now in its fifth year, the Woodstock Writers Festival kicks off tonight with four days of workshops, story slams, and panels that put writers, readers and bibliophiles together to talk about what they love.

Many of the events are already sold out, but a few are still open, including the keynote address by actor Stephen Tobolowsky, an interview with Jennifer Clement, the author of Prayers for the Stolen, and panels and workshops on journalism, biography, memoir, fiction, and writing "when a nap is preferable."   Read more

Give us your best shot: The 2014 Catskills Outdoor Guide Photo Contest

Above: “Two Boys and a Dog in East Meredith” by Cindy Dunne, the second-place winner of last year's Catskills Outdoor Guide photo contest.

Update: The contest is now closed. Winners will be announced on May 27, when the 2014 Catskills Outdoor Guide hits the streets. Thanks for all the great shots. To see all the entries this year, click here. -- Julia Reischel

As part of our 2014 Catskills Outdoor Guide, we're hosting a 2014 edition of our "Catskills Outdoor Experience" photo contest, once again sponsored by the Peekamoose Restaurant & Tap Room in Big Indian.  Read more

Desperate times call for desperate measures

Our Catskills Food Guide editor Jennifer Strom photographed this turkey making like a chickadee at a bird feeder in Roxbury today. After the cold, hard winter we've had, wildlife is especially stressed. 

It's not just in the Catskills where animals are hungry. "Tough New York City birds" are having an equally rough time, according to the New York Daily News

“It has been crazy,” said Cathy Horvath, who volunteers with Wildlife in Need of Rescue and Rehabilitation. “We’re getting calls about swans coming up to people begging for food and ducks crashing into pavement thinking it was water.”

Folks upstate have noticed similar behavior, according to a story in the Ithaca Journal:  Read more

This weekend: Community news potluck in Livingston Manor

Above: An editorial meeting of the youth-run newspaper Manor Ink. Photo by Manor Ink.  

How can we make community news in the Catskills better? Come by the first-ever Community News Summit in Livingston Manor this Sunday and tell us in person over a potluck dinner. 

The staff of the Watershed Post will be onhand along with other startup news organizations like the youth-run Livingston Manor newspaper Manor Ink, which is hosting the summit at the Catskill Arts Society on Main Street. 

We'll be sharing ideas about emergency reporting, community engagement, ads vs. fundraising, and how to cover every town in an enormous rural area.

If you're a news junkie or just are just curious about how the news gets made, please attend! It's not community news without the community. 

Left: Watershed Post editor Lissa Harris and Jim Ottaway, Jr., the chairman of the journalism committee of the Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation. Photo taken July 22, 2013 by the staff of Manor Ink

The summit is being organized by the Community Reporting Alliance, and features journalism start-ups and outlets that are funded by the Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation. Both the CRA and the Ottaway Foundation have funded the Watershed Post, and we can't say enough great stuff about them. 

Community News Summit. Sunday, March 16, 2-5pm. Catskill Arts Society, 48 Main Street, Livingston Manor. Potluck dinner -- bring something to share. 845.701.6125 or email manorink@yahoo.com for into and directions. 

Here's the full press release about the summit below:   Read more

A very Catskills St. Patrick's Day

Above: The Edward Maloney Memorial Pipe Band marches in the 2013 St. Patrick's Day Parade in Delhi. Photo courtesy of the Delhi St. Patrick's Day Parade committee.

‘Tis time again to celebrate the Irish, those poetic and tenacious folks who’ve brought so much to the cultural feast. Suffer mightily they may have done, but as Irish fighter Bobby Sands put it, “Our revenge will be the laughter of our children.”

When folks like that party, it’s not to be missed. Here’s our guide to the region’s various St. Paddy's Day festivities.

DELAWARE COUNTY

On Saturday, March 15, come out to Plattekill Mountain in Roxbury for an all-day "St. Platty’s Day" celebration, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. They’re cooking corned beef and cabbage to go with the Irish drink specials and live entertainment. Outdoors, there will be a barbecue and a Shamrock Hunt.   Read more

This weekend: The Iditarod comes to Livingston Manor

Above: Kim Darst racing in the 2009 Iditarod. Photo contributed by Morgan Outdoors. 

The Iditarod, the 1,000-mile sled dog race that takes place annually in Alaska, kicked off on March 1 this year. Today, dog teams and mushers are about halfway through the course, which stretches from Anchorage to Nome, and will keep running for about another week.

To celebrate the race, Kim Darst and her sled dog Cotton are visiting Morgan Outdoors in Livingston Manor tomorrow to talk about their harrowing experience in the 2009 Iditarod, which is the basis for a book, "Cotton's Tale.

According to the Star-Ledger in New Jersey, Darst had to choose between finishing the Iditarod and keeping Cotton alive: 

The dog or the dream? Rookie Iditarod musher Kim Darst had a decision to make.  Read more

This weekend: "Sylvia," a doggy love triangle

What happens when the perfect woman is a dog? A canine-human love triangle. At least, that's what happens in "Sylvia," a play about a childless Manhattan couple and the eponymous dog that comes into their lives, opening at the Shandaken Theatrical Society tomorrow. 

The show's charm comes from the fact that Sylvia is played by a human. Here's a snippet of dialogue, from the New York Times review of the show when it opened in NYC in 1995:

Greg, middle-aged and middle-class, returns to his Upper West Side apartment in the late afternoon accompanied by Sylvia, a beautiful, frisky young blonde he has just picked up in the park ...

Sylvia: "I think you're God."

Greg (trying to maintain order): "Stay, Sylvia. Stay. And sit."

Sylvia: "I want to sit near you."

Greg: "Well all right."

Sylvia moves to his side.

Sylvia (dreamily): "Nearer, my God, to Thee."

Greg (being severe): "O.K. As long as you sit."  Read more


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