Arts

As it switches to digital, Coxsackie drive-in movie theater stars in its own film

Top: The sign for the Hi-Way Drive-In. Photo courtesy of “Enjoy Your Intermission.”

Some Catskills families run farms or general stores; for Roger and Sharon Babcock, the family business is the Hi-Way Drive-In Theatre on Route 9W in the Greene County town of Coxsackie.  

Like a family farm, a drive-in is an anachronistic business. There are only 400 or so drive-in theaters left in the United States, and some, like the Hi-Way, are still showing movies on 35 millimeter film, a format that movie studios are abandoning.

But nostalgia for artifacts of the 1950s (the Hi-Way opened in 1951) is strong, especially in the Catskills. The Babcocks told the Daily Freeman last year that their audience is loyal and growing, with regulars coming weekly to park their cars and watch a film outside under the stars.  Read more

This weekend: Art.Write.Now.Tour in Livingston Manor

Above: "Finn Does Not Like Bowling," by Elinor Hills, one of the works being exhibited in the Art.Write.Now.Tour 2014-15. Image used with permission from the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers.

Over 100 teenage artists from around the country will exhibit their work in Livingston Manor beginning this weekend when the national Art.Write.Now.Tour comes to the Catskill Art Society. The month-long show features the young winners of the the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, an annual national competition that has been running for 92 years. 

The Catskill Art Society is the last stop on a three-city tour for the exhibition, which features a stunning array of visual art and a selection of written works, including works by five national student poets. You can see all of the visual works in this photo collection on Flickr -- but they'll be better in person.   Read more

This Weekend: January February March guided audio walks

"All sounds are sharper in winter." That quote, attributed to famed 19th-century naturalist John Burroughs, is how arts writer Jennifer Kabat begins her hour-and-a-half-long guided audio walk through the winter landscape of the Catskills. 

It's part of a project that Kabat, along with her collaborators, New Zealand artist Kate Newby, curator Tim Saltarelli and writer Anna Moschovakis, are calling the "January February March."

The project is part podcast, part art installation and part snowy winter ramble through two Delaware County towns: Middletown, near the center of the Catskill Park, and Hobart, the home of a large oxycodone factory and the "Hobart Book Village."  Read more

This Weekend: Valentine's Day in the Catskills

Above: Snowmen in love in Roxbury promote Sunday's Hearts in the Hamlet event, via Facebook.

Just when we desperately need a celebration to take the edge off the cabin fever and the late-winter blahs, here it is Valentine’s Day. What could be lovelier? In the Catskills, love is something that’s celebrated year round, but this weekend it’s the star of the show. Come out and create and play and feast and dance. All events are happening on Valentine's Day itself -- Saturday, Feb. 14 -- unless otherwise indicated. 

DELAWARE COUNTY  Read more

The winners of the 2015 Catskills Food Guide Photo Contest

The 2015 Catskills Food Guide is out. Click here for more info. - Ed.

Each year, we ask readers of the Watershed Post and our Catskills Food Guide to send us their best photos of Catskills food and farms. This year, 32 photographers entered our 2015 Catskills Food Guide Photo Contest

Thanks to our contest sponsor, Peekamoose Restaurant & Tap Room in Big Indian, who generously awarded a $75 gift certificate to our grand prize winner. 

Thanks to everyone who entered. To see all of those great photos, click here

Grand Prize Winner   Read more

Hundreds line up for free driftwood

Above: Tyler Borchet, center, searches the driftwood pile at the Jan. 23 driftwood giveaway in Olivebridge. Photo by Julia Reischel. 

Driftwood is the Catskills version of the iPhone -- people line up around the block to get it.

Hundreds waited in below-freezing weather in the Ulster County hamlet of Olivebridge on Friday, Jan. 23 for a chance to pick through a pile of free driftwood being given away by the New York City Department of Environmental Protection.

The NYC watershed agency removes driftwood from the shores of its Catskills reservoirs every year. To get rid of the driftwood, the agency used to burn it. But this year, it tried something new: giving it away to the public.

Above: The line for driftwood. Photo by Julia Reischel.   Read more

DEP: Artists, come get our driftwood

Above: "Driftwood Cove" in the Ashokan Reservoir. Photo via the NYC DEP.

The New York City Department of Environmental Protection is hosting an odd event this Friday, Jan. 23: A driftwood giveaway.

The DEP has a driftwood glut on its Ashokan Reservoir, one of the city's upstate lakes that supplies NYC's drinking water. A portion of the reservoir's west basin is dubbed "Driftwood Cove" because of the large amount of wood that piles up along its shores after washing down the Esopus Creek through the Catskills, according to a DEP press release. 

For years, the DEP has given its driftwood away to artists, who use it in sculptures and crafts. But in that past, the DEP has also burned some driftwood, which has disappointed some artists who wanted as much of the wood as they could get.  Read more

Follow us on Instagram

Above: An ice-covered plant, photographed by John of Catskills Photography and shared in the Watershed Post's Flickr pool and on our new Instagram account.

Sharing and regramming photos on Instagram is one of our New Year's resolutions. So far, we're sticking to it.  We're posting photos from our news stories and sharing images from the amazing photographers among our readers and neighbors from around the Catskills. 

Follow us and share your photos with us on Instagram by clicking here.

This weekend: Grand opening party for the rebuilt Phoenicia Library

Above: The Phoenicia Library's snazzy new sign, via its Facebook page

After the Phoenicia Library burned down on March 19, 2011, it took almost four years for it to rise from the ashes. But rise it did, with the close-knit Shandaken community raising $800,000 to support the rebuilding project with state grants, insurance monies, bake sales, restaurant fundraisers, and large donations from neighbors.  

The library re-opened in its totally restored 48 Main Street building on Jan. 2. The structure now boasts a state-of-the-art design that cuts its energy costs to the bare minimum, and a lot of exciting architectural and technological bells and whistles. From a press release from the library's director, Liz Potter:   Read more

Will 2015 be the year of the Catskills?

Above: Barnes Hill on a sunny fall day in 2014. Photo by Dennis Schevjda, via Flickr

If the national travel press has anything to do with it, the Catskills will be flooded with tourists in 2015.

Two separate publications, Fodor's and Travel + Leisure, have put the region on their lists of the best places in the world (the world!) to visit next year.

Fodor's Go List 2015 lumps "The Hudson Valley and the Catskills" together, and lists them as #2, right after "The Arctic" and before Namibia and Guatemala:  Read more


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