Middleburgh

Transition Catskills

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” – Margaret Mead

Transition Catskills is part of a worldwide network of grassroots community initiatives that seek to address the world’s most pressing challenges with citizen-led action.

The goal of Transition is to create a vibrant, diverse, and relocalized economy that is less dependent on fossil fuels and global supply chains. If we can provide for as many of our needs as possible from relatively close to home, we become more resilient— as individuals and as a community, we can maintain our identity and ability to function despite change and shocks from the outside.

In Transition, we take issues that feel toxic — peak oil, climate change, economic contraction — and we turn them into opportunities for positive change. The movement is rooted in the idea that by taking personal action in our communities, we can not only overcome these threats, but we can also live more fulfilling lives by forging a deeper connection to our neighbors and our local environment.  Read more

845-586-3500

The Catskills wedding boom

Above: At Handsome Hollow in Long Eddy, couples can say their vows in a fern-strewn clearing in the woods on the 93-acre property. Photo by JBM Photography.

Catskills weddings – especially those with an outdoorsy twist – are on the rise.

Getting hitched in hills is a booming business. Thanks to the wedding industry, there has been a recent uptick in tourism spending in the Catskills.

“We’ve noticed over the last couple years that there’s been quite an increase in country weddings in the area,” said Rick Remsnyder, Ulster County's tourism director.

“It’s a good location and the price is right. We’re 90 minutes from midtown Manhattan and the price is more affordable than the metro area.”

Cathy Ballone, a wedding planner in Greene County, owes her career to the increase in outdoor upstate weddings.

“I see a definite boom,” said Ballone, who runs Cathy’s Elegant Events out of the old Catskill Game Farm in Catskill, which she and her husband recently bought.  Read more

Mountainside Welcomes Noted Woodstock Artist

Stop by lobby of Mountainside Residential Care Center to view the works of Michael Heinrich.  Half the proceeds from sale of Mr. Heinrichs art will benefit the residents Sunshine Fund.

For information contact Michelle Powers, MRCC Activities Director, by calling MRCC 845-586-1800 Ext. 3341 or email [email protected].

 

This Weekend: I Love My Park Day in the Catskills

Above: A poster for Cairo's Town Picnic, one of several events celebrating "I Love My Park Day" in the Catskills this Saturday, May 2.

Saturday, May 2 is the “I Love My Park Day,” a day of outdoor cleanup and volunteerism sponsored by the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation and the Parks and Trails of New York organization.

One of the woes of the Catskill Park is that it is not technically overseen by New York State’s parks office. Instead, the Catskill Park is a patchwork of wild forests, small state parks and wildernesses overseen by the New York State Department of Conservation.

This means that the Catskills themselves aren’t featured prominently in I Love My Park Day. But that’s not stopping towns and other organizations in the Catskills from celebrating it.  Read more

Young bald eagle shot in Otsego County

Above: A juvenile bald eagle was treated for a gunshot wound by Wes Laraway at the New York Wildlife Rescue Center. Photo by Wes Laraway.

A juvenile bald eagle was shot and left to starve in Otsego County last week, according to wildlife rehabilitator Wes Laraway, who runs the New York Wildlife Rescue Center in the Schoharie County town of Middleburgh. 

Shooting a bald eagle is a federal crime. The Bald Eagle Act of 1940 specifically protects the species, and shooting at a bald eagle is punishable by fines and prison time, according to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Laraway, who has been rehabilitating wild animals and doing rescue work for 20 years, said that it is unlikely that such a shooting could be an accident.

“There’s no way that anybody could accidentally shoot an eagle. There’s really no other bird that looks like an eagle,” he said. “I’ve seen gunshot wounds on birds of prey before, but I’ve never seen gunshot wounds on an a eagle, and I’ve taken in a dozen.”

The bald eagle that was shot is probably a three- or four-year-old female. She still has the brown head feathers of a juvenile, Laraway said.  Read more

Spring Open House

Early season leads to record bear hunt in southern New York

Above: The 580-pound bear Greene County hunter Tim Meservey shot during the early season in September 2014. Photo courtesy of Tim Meservey.

Bear hunters in New York's Southern Zone killed a record 1,110 bears in 2014, according to harvest figures that the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation released on Monday, April 13. That's 12 percent more than the previous record of 983 bears taken in the Southern Zone in 2011.

The record harvest is likely due to a new early bear hunting season that ran from Sept. 6 to Sept. 21 in portions of the Catskills and the western Hudson Valley, DEC officials say.

Catskills hunters in in Delaware, Greene, Schoharie, Sullivan and Ulster counties killed 893 bears in 2014, according to an analysis of the DEC's hunt data by the Watershed Post. In the Catskills, hunters killed 294 bears during the new early season and 599 during the bow hunting, muzzleloading and regular seasons, which occur later in the fall.

The Catskills towns with the highest bear harvests are Hancock, with 34 bears killed; Wawarsing, with 32; Tusten, with 31; Rochester, with 27; and Mamakating, with 24.  Read more

Think green...the green fairways of Golf

Not too soon to Save the Date for the Margaretville Health Foundation 2015 Golf Tournament at College Golf Course in Delhi taking place Thursday, August 6th. 

For a list of Business Sponsorhip Levels please call 845-586-2631 Extension 3181 and speak to Liz Warren or email [email protected]

Gone fishin': Anglers celebrate on a freezing opening day

Above: Boys Fishing, by Amanda Lee Popp. Submitted to the 2014 Catskills Outdoor Guide Photo Contest. 

April Fool’s day is the first day of fishing season in New York state, and it's playing a freezing cold joke on hopeful anglers vying to catch the first trout of the year.

It's a cold and icy beginning to trout season, with a high of only 38 degrees and snow falling over Cairns Pool on the Beaverkill, according to the Catskill Fly Fishing Center and Museum’s Facebook page. Nevertheless, trout were reportedly caught there today, the center reports.

Above: The ice-covered Upper Delaware River on Monday, March 30. Photo by Tony Ritter, via Twitter.   Read more

The Gift That Keeps On Giving

See video

The Margaretville Health Foundation has established a Planned Giving program offering numerous financial and tax advantages to those who participate. A planned gift is any major gift, made from the assets of a donor- in lifetime or at death-as part of your overall financial and estate planning. Our goal is to create an endowment fund that sustains the hospital and nursing home for thelong term.

Our focus is for maintaining, improving and innovating long term sustainabilityfor the Margaretville Campus. The Margaretville Health Foundation’s planned giving program is something that you can create to benefit you and your family today and establish a legacy, while also ensuring that vital human care programs are available for generations to come.

There are 3 types of planned gifts:

• Outright gifts that use appreciated assets as a substitute for cash

• Gifts that return income or other financial benefits to the donor in return for the contribution

• Gifts payable upon the donors death  Read more


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