Delhi

Upcoming Events in Delhi

No events yet -- add an upcoming event by clicking "Post an Event" on the right side of this page.

Community Announcements

Have a community announcement you'd like to share? Registered and logged-in users can post personal and non-profit announcements for free. Click "Post>Announcements" under the "Manage My Account" menu, or click here.

All announcements are moderated, so it make take a few days for us to review your submission.

Tenants and homeowners displaced by Delhi fire

Several fire companies battled a major structure fire Monday morning at a home on 4 Franklin Street in Delhi, just off the village's Main Street. Photo by Cathy Roloson and used with permission. (Thanks everyone for helping us track down the photographer!) 

An elderly couple and eight others are safe after a three-story Victorian on Franklin Street was destroyed by fire the morning of February 3, 2014. 

The home at 4 Franklin Street, just off the town's Main Street, belongs to Gerard and Lilly Breen. The couple rented several apartments on the second and third floors of their home to tenants, according to Steve Hood, the assistant chief of the Delhi Fire Department.

Four SUNY Delhi students, three of their guests, and another woman who lived in an apartment on the third floor, were in the house at the time of the fire. No one was injured.

The blaze, which began around 8:15am Monday morning, began on the third floor, Hood said. No cause has been determined.  Read more

Fatal shooting at DEP office in Kingston

Left: David N. Reese, who was arrested and charged with murder in the 2nd degree after allegedly shooting a coworker at the DEP on February 3, 2014. Photo via the Kingston Police Department's Facebook page. 

A 33-year-old Olivebridge man was fatally shot by a coworker at the Kingston office of the New York City Department of Environmental Protection at 71 Smith Avenue around 6:45 a.m. on Monday morning. A suspect in the shooting was taken into custody at the scene shortly after the incident.  Read more

DEP touts increased access for boaters, hikers and hunters in 2013

Fishing on the Pepacton Reservoir: Has that umbrella been steam-cleaned? Photo taken July 17, 2013; from the New York City Department of Environmental Protection's Flickr page.

In the past few years, there's been a shift of attitude at the New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), where officials are increasingly rolling out a welcome mat for hikers, boaters, anglers and hunters who want to use city property. On lands near the city's west-of-Hudson reservoirs, where once hiking groups had trouble even getting permission to cross DEP property, the agency is now actively working with hiking groups to build trails.  Read more

Bad news boars: Helicopter crew fights NY feral swine

Above: A trailcam captures a nighttime view of a wild boar in Delaware County. Photo taken in August of 2013; courtesy of Justin Gansowski of the USDA.

This week, federal wildlife agents armed with cameras and sniper rifles are patrolling New York State skies by helicopter, hoping for a glimpse of wild pigs. It's the latest mission in an ongoing battle to rid the state of feral swine, before most New Yorkers even realize the state has a pig problem.

It's far too late for Texas, whose $500-million-a-year feral pig problem has been dubbed the "aporkalypse." In Florida, the pestilential pigs are found in every county, and have even destroyed a $16 million F-16 fighter plane. Pigs are a moot point in Mississippi, where experts say it's "only a matter of time" before feral swine rut and root their way from rural Clay County to the far corners of the state

But it might not be too late for New York, according to the handful of state and federal regulators whose task it is to try to keep feral swine from getting established in the Empire State.

  Read more

NYC mayor comes out swinging against fracking

New York City's newly-inaugurated mayor, Bill de Blasio, made it clear he's opposed to hydraulic fracturing in New York State in a speech to fellow mayors in Washington D.C. on Thursday.

De Blasio told the U.S. Conference of Mayors that "the one thing I am firm about is that I don't see any place for fracking," Capital New York reports. The mayor spoke in favor of a statewide moratorium: 

“The science simply isn’t reliable enough," de Blasio said on Thursday. "The technology isn’t reliable enough. And there’s too much danger to our water supply, to our environment in general. So my view is that there should be a moratorium on fracking in New York State until the day comes that we can actually prove it’s safe, and I don’t think that day is coming any time soon.”  Read more

SUNY Delhi's online courses get national accolades

Above: Screenshot of the U.S. News & World Report online education website, featuring SUNY Delhi as tied for First Place.

What do you do when you're the only college for miles in the middle of rural upstate New York? Invest in online-only courses. 

It's a strategy that's worked for SUNY Delhi, a rural technical college in the Catskills that just tied for first place in U.S. News & World Report's 2014 rankings for Best Online Bachelor Programs. (The other first-place winner for the category was Central Michigan University.) 

Delhi got the nod for its online Bachelor of Science in Nursing program, designed to allow working nurses to earn a bachelor's degree. The college specializes in technical degrees -- programs like culinary arts, criminal justice, and turf management.  Read more

High-speed chase on Route 28 ends in arrest

A Delhi 16-year-old was arrested Wednesday after leading state police on a high-speed chase on Route 28, eventually ditching his car and fleeing into the woods.

Around 4:40 in the afternoon on Wednesday, Jan. 22, state police responded to a report of an unauthorized vehicle on Route 28 near Gladstone Hollow in Andes. When troopers attempted to stop the car, the driver fled, speeding and driving erratically to avoid being pulled over, according to a police statement

The driver sped eastward on Route 28 and fled all the way from Andes to Olive, over 40 miles away. The car was stopped on Route 28 near Mountain Road in Olive by a "stinger" tire deflation device deployed by police. 

The driver, 16-year-old Wade Armstrong of Delhi, abandoned the car and fled into the woods where he was arrested, police said.   Read more

Scenes from a Catskills cold snap

Above: Even in subzero weather, Roxbury looks picture-perfect. Photo taken Wednesday at sunset by Greg Henderson of the Roxbury Motel.

Above: It's a nippy 4.1 degrees right now on Belleayre Mountain, but the freshly-groomed corduroy looks pretty inviting. Photo posted today on Belleayre's Facebook page

  Read more

NY doubles down on high-tech weather forecasting

Meteorologist Mitch Gilt of the National Weather Service measures snowfall in Binghamton after a recent storm. Photo from NWS Binghamton's Facebook page.

After three major storms in three years, New Yorkers are investing heavily in high-tech weather forecasting. 

In his proposed budget for 2014-2015, released on Tuesday, Jan. 21, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced a plan to set aside $15 million of federal aid earmarked for Hurricane Sandy to build a "state-of-the-art weather detection system" that will create scores of new weather stations throughout the state. From the governor's budget proposal:

The system will provide real-time warnings of local extreme weather and flood conditions, and identify threats to communities, roads, bridges and the electric system. Data will be available for use in predictive modeling and early warnings to prevent loss of life and property. The number of weather stations will be increased from the current 27 to over 100, creating a highly sophisticated real-time weather reporting network that will accelerate and improve information sharing, thereby assisting emergency responders in responding to extreme weather events. 

The New York City Department of Environmental Protection, which oversees the city's upstate reservoirs, has also been investing heavily in weather technology lately. The DEP needs accurate weather data -- especially streamflow data -- to manage more than a billion gallons a day flowing through the city's water system. 

  Read more

The commissioner grew carrots

Above: New York State Agricultural Society President Diane Held congratulates Schoharie County farmer Richard Ball, recently appointed as New York State's new Commissioner of Agriculture, at the group's 2014 forum on New York agriculture. Photo from the New York State Agricultural Society's Facebook page.

Look through the roster of New York State's top agricultural officials, and you might notice they've got something in common: Cows.   Read more